News Category: Humanities in American Life

Nevada Humanities: Making Voices Heard

When you walk into an art gallery, do you move clockwise or counterclockwise? Are your eyes drawn to the color, the medium, the framing, or the other people milling around? These are just a few questions Nevada Humanities asked themselves when they were adapting their latest exhibition, “Resiliency: A Blooming Diaspora,” online. A lot about the way we move in the world has changed this year because of the pandemic, and walking through a gallery is no exception, but Nevada Humanities knows that doesn’t mean the experience is any less powerful. Read on.

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A Soundtrack for 21st-Century Rural Kansas

Ever hear a song on the radio and feel transported to a place in your mind? John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads” or Sam Cooke’s “A Change is Gonna Come” tell the story of America like only music can. Humanities Kansas wanted to capture that feeling as a state-specific part of the “Crossroads: Change in Rural America” tour, a nationwide travelling exhibition focused on rural communities. So they came up with a program called “The Soundtrack of Rural America,” a curated playlist made for and by Kansans. Read more here.

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Discover Your Humanities Horoscope – Fall Edition

This October brings a mix of historical gravity and the spooky supernatural. Whether you side with the 1597 admonishment of astrology as “thou damned mock-art and thou brainsick tale” or the earlier 1523 celebration of it as “many noble thyngis Of wandryng of the mone, the course of the sun” (as per the Oxford English Dictionary), you can count on Humanities Horoscopes to reveal some of America’s historic highlights. You never know what unlikely figure your planetary forecast might uncover. Discover your Humanities Horoscope and let us know whether your spooky connection ghosted you or is howl-ingly accurate!

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Uncovering the News: The Who, Where, When, Why, and How of Media Consumption Today with Georgia Broadcasting and Georgia Humanities

“No matter where you get your news, the goal of this program is to help you recognize how to get the best information available as a responsible news consumer, so that you can contribute to our democracy as an informed citizen,” said Laura McCarty, president of Georgia Humanities. Read more about his “Democracy and the Informed Citizen” program.

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Haudenosaunee Women and 1,000 Years of Political Agency

“The story I’m going to tell you… is really the beginning of the women’s movement. The truth is, there was an incredible party going on well before we ever arrived,” began Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner, the guest lecturer for “Women Voted Here: Before Columbus,” a Vermont Humanities virtual event on October 21, 2020, hosted by St. Michael’s College. Read more here.

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Challenging Our Own Thinking: Former MN Supreme Court Justice Alan C. Page Talks About Growing Up in the 1950s and Discrimination in America

On a Wednesday afternoon gathered together on Zoom, Dr. Faith Wambura Ngunjiri, director of the Lorentzen Center for Faith and Work and associate professor of Ethics and Leadership at the Offutt School of Business at Concordia College, opened a conversation with former Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Alan C. Page by asking what she called a safe and gentle question: Why is it so difficult to talk about race?

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