PROGRAM: Talking about Dying

Presented by:
Oregon Humanities
Local Partner: Libraries Subject: Cross-Cultural Understanding, Other, Schwartz Prize Nominee Audience: All

Talking About Dying was developed to create more public opportunities to reflect on the stories and influences that shape people’s thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. These conversations are free ninety-minute facilitated discussions geared toward public audiences (ages 15+). During the program, participants discuss questions such as:

  • What do we want – and not want – at the end of our life?
  • How might our family, culture, religion, and beliefs shape how we think about death?
  • How do access to care, geography, and desires to be remembered affect our decisions about the end of our life?

In 2015, the council partnered with libraries to offer 38 discussions that engaged more than 750 Oregonians. In 2017, the council will continue the program to ensure even more Oregonians have access to this important conversation. As of March, 28 conversations have been scheduled. Applications to host this important conversation are approved on a rolling basis while funds are available.

 

Starting September 2016, Oregon Humanities presented thirty-eight discussions in communities all over the state about what we think about and pay attention to as we approach death. These one-time, ninety-minute conversations are offered in partnership with Cambia Health Foundation and will provide opportunities for participants to reflect on what stories and influences shape their thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. Facilitators of Talking about Dying programs are trained professionals working in the fields of chaplaincy, counseling, gerontology, facilitation, and hospice care. The conversations are free and open to the public