OVERVIEW: Texas Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Activities

Presented by:
Humanities Texas
Current Initiative: Centennial Campfires National Partner: The Pulitzer Prizes Local Partner: Colleges and Universities, Libraries Subject: Journalism, Other, Varies Audience: All

“Conquering Polio and Other Medical Advances of the 1940s and 1950s” – June 15th, Austin

Humanities Texas partnered with The University of Texas at Austin College of Liberal Arts to hold a public lecture and discussion featuring David M. Oshinsky, director of the Division of Medical Humanities at New York University, on Wednesday, June 15, 2016. Oshinsky received the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for History for Polio: An American Story. His lecture examined the changes in American life and culture in the decades following World War II. Approximately seventy people attended the Oshinsky lecture.

“Rival Visions of America: Economic Development in the 1820s and Beyond” – June 6th, Houston

Humanities Texas partnered with the University of Houston to hold a public lecture and discussion by Daniel Walker Howe, Rhodes Professor of American History Emeritus at Oxford University and professor of history emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles. Howe spoke on Tuesday, June 7, 2016. The content of his lecture was drawn from What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815–1848, for which he received the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for History. Approximately seventy people attended the Howe lecture.

“Colonial Transformations” – June 12th, San Antonio

Humanities Texas partnered with The University of Texas at San Antonio to organize a public lecture and discussion by Alan Taylor on Sunday, June 12, 2016. Taylor, who holds the Thomas Jefferson Chair in American History at the University of Virginia, received the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772­–1832, and the 1996 Prize for History for William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic. Taylor’s lecture, titled “Colonial Transformations,” surveyed early encounters between European colonists and Native Americans. Approximately one hundred people attended the Taylor lecture.

A Lecture by Gilbert King – July 21st, Dallas

Humanities Texas partnered with the Friends of the Dallas Public Library to hold a public lecture by Gilbert King on Thursday, July 21, 2016. King received the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction for The Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America, which recounts a largely forgotten chapter in the history of racial injustice in the United States and details the tactics used by Thurgood Marshall to chip away at the foundations of Jim Crow law. The program included a presentation by King on the importance of the historic Groveland case. Chris Vognar, culture critic for the Dallas Morning News, then interviewed King about his research on Marshall, the case, and its lasting impact. A public question-and-answer session followed the conversation between King and Vognar. The event, held at the Dallas Public Library, had 115 attendees, including a group of high school students from the Barack Obama Leadership Academy, a school in the Dallas Independent School District.

“A Century of Excellence” – Spetember 29th, Denton

Humanities Texas partnered with the UNT Mayborn School of Journalism to host a panel presentation by ten of the school’s Pulitzer Prize-winning or Pulitzer Prize-finalist graduates. The event took place on the UNT campus on September 29, 2016. Participants included Leona Allen (1994 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service), Kerry Gunnels (1994 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting), Gayle Reaves (1994 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting), David Klement (1968 Pulitzer Prize for Local General or Spot News Reporting), Dan Malone (1992 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting), Ray Moseley (1982 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for International Reporting), Kalani Gordon (2016 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for Breaking News), Eric Gay (2006 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for Breaking News Photography ), Melissa Boughton (2016 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for Breaking News), and Kenneth “Chip” Somodevilla (2016 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for Breaking News Photography). In the panel presentation, the Mayborn graduates discussed their work and its significance and then participated in a question-and-answer session with the audience. George Getschow, the writer-in-residence at the Mayborn School and a Pulitzer Prize finalist himself, moderated the event. More than 400 people attended the event.

 

MAJOR PARTNERSHIPS:

  • University of Texas at Austin’s College of Liberal Arts
  • LBJ Presidential Library
  • University of Houston
  • University of Texas, San Antonio
  • Friends of the Dallas Public Library
  • University of North Texas’ Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism

LOCATIONS:

  • Austin, TX
  • Houston, TX
  • San Antonio, TX
  • Dallas, TX
  • Denton, TX

PULITZER PRIZE PARTICIPANTS:

  • David M. Oshinsky, History (2006)
  • Daniel Walker Howe, History (2008)
  • Alan Taylor, History (1996, 2014)
  • Gilbert King, General Nonfiction (2013)
  • Leona Allen, Public Service – Akron Beacon Journal (1994)
  • Kerry Gunnels, International Reporting – Dallas Morning News (1994)
  • David Klement, Local General/Spot News Reporting – Detroit Free Press (1968)
  • Dan Malone, Investigative Reporting – Dallas Morning News (1992)
  • Gayle Reaves, International Reporting – Dallas Morning News (1994)

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