2017 NHC Offsite Sessions

Out of the Closet, Freedom Trail Sessions Available for Conference Attendees.

2017 Offsite Sessions

The 2017 National Humanities Conference offers two offsite sessions around Boston, MA on Saturday, November 4 from 9:30 am to 11:30 am. Scroll down to learn about Out of the Closet: A Tour of Boston’s First Pride Route and Freedom Trail: Meetings, Mobs, & Martyrs, and don’t forget to register early to secure a spot!

Out of the Closet: A Tour of Boston's First Pride Route

Description

Tour Stops

Saturday, Nov. 4th from 9:30 am to 11:30 am

Boston’s first official Gay Pride March was held on Saturday, June 26, 1971. When the March took place it sought to highlight four oppressive institutions in Boston: the police, the government, hostile bars, and religious institutions. Join the History Project for a walking tour that follows the first Pride March’s route and tells the stories of the community groups, individuals, and issues related to the route.

About the Presenter: Joan Ilacqua will present the tour. Ilacqua is co-chair of the Board of Directors of The History Project and has volunteered with the organization for more than three years. As a public historian with a passion for uncovering and highlighting narratives of underrepresented people, Joan also serves as the Archivist for Women in Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

About the History Project: Documenting LGBTQ Boston: This is Boston’s community LGBTQ archives and an all-volunteer organization established in 1980. The History Project houses New England’s largest independent LGBTQ archives and serves to collect, preserve, and share Boston’s rich LGBTQ history.

Space is limited to 20 participants. There is no cost for this session.

The Boston Equality Trail, the pride route this tour follows, encompasses over 14 stops. The four major stops of the tour are listed below.

Bay Village Bar Jacques
Opened in 1938, Jacques became a gay bar in the mid-1940s. In 1965, its owner also opened, directly across the street, The Other Side, the first discotheque in the city to allow same-sex dancing. After serving as the city’s only lesbian bar from the late 1960s to the early 1970s, Jacques evolved into a venue for drag performers, which remains its focus to today.

Boston Police Headquarters on Berkeley Street
Marchers in Boston’s first Gay Pride March in 1971 made their second stop here, to address issues related to police and the LGBT community. It wasn’t until 1978 that the BPD created a position that was to work directly with and to address the needs and concerns of members of the LGBT community.

The State House on Beacon Hill
The Massachusetts State House, built in 1798, contains the Governor’s offices, the House of Representatives, and the Massachusetts Senate. In 1974, Elaine Noble was elected the first openly gay person in the nation to hold an elective state office. Over the years, the state house has been the site of many protests over LGBT rights issues and, in the early 2000s, saw Massachusetts become the first state in the United States to legalize same-sex marriage.

St. Paul’s Cathedral on Tremont Street
St. Paul’s has a long history of supporting the LGBT community in Boston. Some of the earliest public healing services for people with AIDS were held here. The Episcopal faith was one of the first Christian groups to recognize same-sex marriages and to create a same-sex marriage ceremony. The church also allows for the leadership of gay and lesbian bishops.

Freedom Trail: Meetings, Mobs, & Matyrs
Saturday, Nov. 4th from 9:30 am to 11:30 am

When Parliament imposed taxes and unpopular policies on the American colonies, Boston gained a reputation of defiance. But how did the coming Revolution look to Bostonians from inside the meeting halls and out in the streets? Join this 60 minute tour and explore the individual paths taken by three different Bostonians toward Revolutionary actions and ideas. Attendees will meet in the conference hotel lobby and then walk to the National Park Service Visitor Center at Fanueil Hall.

About the Presenter: Eric Hanson Plass, a park ranger for the Boston National Historic Park, will lead the tour. Eric holds an MA in Public History from UMass Boston and has over ten years of experience in the field. His thesis, entitled “So Succeeded by a Kind Providence”: Communities of Color in Eighteenth Century Boston, provides a base of research to broaden the narrative of colonial and revolutionary Boston in general, and the stories told along the Freedom Trail in particular. He also works on projects for the National Parks of Boston that use technology to better connect people to history.

Space is limited to 40 participants. There is no cost for this session.

Out of the Closet: A Tour of Boston's First Pride Route
Saturday, Nov. 4th from 9:30 am to 11:30 am

Boston’s first official Gay Pride March was held on Saturday, June 26, 1971. When the March took place it sought to highlight four oppressive institutions in Boston: the police, the government, hostile bars, and religious institutions. Join the History Project for a walking tour that follows the first Pride March’s route and tells the stories of the community groups, individuals, and issues related to the route.

About the Presenter: Joan Ilacqua will present the tour. Ilacqua is co-chair of the Board of Directors of The History Project and has volunteered with the organization for more than three years. As a public historian with a passion for uncovering and highlighting narratives of underrepresented people, Joan also serves as the Archivist for Women in Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

About the History Project: Documenting LGBTQ Boston: This is Boston community LGBTQ archives. An all-volunteer organization established in 1980. The History Project is New England’s largest independent LGBTQ archives and serves to collect, preserve, and share Boston’s rich LGBTQ history.

Space is limited to 20 participants. There is no cost for this session.

The Boston Equality Trail, the pride route this tour follows, encompasses over 14 stops. The four major stops of the tour are listed below.

Bay Village Bar Jacques
Opened in 1938, Jacques became a gay bar in the mid-1940s. In 1965, its owner also opened, directly across the street, The Other Side, the first discotheque in the city to allow same-sex dancing. After serving as the city’s only lesbian bar from the late 1960s to the early 1970s, Jacques evolved into a venue for drag performers, which remains its focus to today.

Boston Police Headquarters on Berkeley Street
Marchers in Boston’s first Gay Pride March in 1971 made their second stop here, to address issues related to police and the LGBT community. It wasn’t until 1978 that the BPD created a position that was to work directly with and to address the needs and concerns of members of the LGBT community.

The State House on Beacon Hill
The Massachusetts State House, built in 1798, contains the Governor’s offices, the House of Representatives, and the Massachusetts Senate. In 1974, Elaine Noble was elected the first openly gay person in the nation to hold an elective state office. Over the years, the state house has been the site of many protests over LGBT rights issues and, in the early 2000s, saw Massachusetts become the first state in the United States to legalize same-sex marriage.

St. Paul’s Cathedral on Tremont Street
St. Paul’s has a long history of supporting the LGBT community in Boston. Some of the earliest public healing services for people with AIDS were held here. The Episcopal faith was one of the first Christian groups to recognize same-sex marriages and to create a same-sex marriage ceremony. The church also allows for the leadership of gay and lesbian bishops.

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